How iOS and iPadOS 15 Improve My Obsidian Note-Taking Setup

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How iOS and iPadOS 15 Improve My Obsidian Note-Taking Setup

It’s been a busy week at MacStories, and, like every year, I’ve spent the past few days editing stories by John and Alex (after all, isn’t this what an Editor in Chief is supposed to do?) and collecting my first notes, thoughts, and tidbits about iOS and iPadOS 15. I’ve been doing all this research in Obsidian (I set it up for WWDC beforehand with a dedicated workspace and sub-folders for sessions and screenshots), which I’ve been running for the entire week on the first developer betas of iOS and iPadOS 15 on my primary devices. Much to my surprise, rather than causing unexpected issues or slowdowns in my note-taking setup, both betas have actually improved my Obsidian workflow in a couple notable ways.

I haven’t “officially” written about Obsidian yet because the mobile app for iPhone and iPad isn’t out of beta yet. Obsidian supporters can install it via TestFlight, but it’s not available on the App Store yet. However, as I previously shared on Connected, I’ve decided to go all-in with Obsidian for 2021: all my note-taking, research, and writing is happening in Obsidian, which I’ve been able to tweak to my specific needs thanks to a suite of custom plugins I’ve commissioned over the past few months. Obsidian can be an intimidating beast (particularly if you start spending too much time fiddling around with settings and custom appearance options), but it unlocks an incredible amount of power thanks to its support for Markdown and third-party plugins; I plan to write about this, and my custom setup in the app, extensively over the coming months, which will include a few special perks for Club MacStories members too.

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